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Twitter Tuesday: Vernon Carey, Josh Green, Kansas, Alabama

RANKINGS: 2018 Rivals150 | 2019 Rivals150 | 2020 Rivals150 | 2018 Team | 2018 Position

In this week’s Twitter Tuesday mailbag, we dive into the recruitment of top-ranked big man Vernon Carey, examine where five-star Josh Green might end up, and break down how things could shake out at Kansas.

RELATED: Five-star Josh Green cuts list to six

Vernon Carey, Jr.
Vernon Carey, Jr. (Nick Lucero/Rivals.com)

Vernon Carey's recruitment is far from over as a commitment is still a few more months away. The top-ranked senior already visited Michigan State in February and will complete official visits to the remaining programs on his final list - Duke, North Carolina, Kentucky and Miami - before the turn of the calendar.

Duke was the favorite a year ago and had created a ton of momentum in Carey's recruitment. Fast-forward to today and Carey is no closer to a Blue Devils' commitment, a sign that the other four in the hunt have a puncher’s chance.

Miami's connection to Carey and his family cannot be topped. Kentucky has picked things up, and North Carolina has remained a factor, too.

In the end though, Michigan State and Duke may be the two to beat. I was much more confident in the Blue Devils a few months ago but Tom Izzo and his staff have not let off the gas and could be rewarded for it.

Josh Green
Josh Green (Kelly Kline/Under Armour)

Five-star guard Josh Green cut his list yesterday to a group of six: UNLV, Arizona, USC, Villanova, North Carolina and Kansas. Green isn't close to a commitment at this point and, despite rumors earlier this summer that the Trojans were in the lead, I believe that his recruitment is wide-open.

If I had to guess, I'd put Arizona, Villanova and North Carolina ahead of USC, UNLV and Kansas in Green's recruitment. Arizona can offer the idea of playing close to his family, Villanova has piqued his interest thanks to its recent string of success and North Carolina has drawn his eye for a while now.

Green's recruitment will play out a bit slower than others as he will be leaving home for his final high school season and attend IMG Academy this fall.

Jeremiah Robinson-Earl
Jeremiah Robinson-Earl (Kelly Kline/Under Armour)

Kansas has prioritized Jeremiah Robinson-Earl and Matthew Hurt as part of its frontcourt recruiting efforts and the Jayhawks have an excellent chance with both prospects.

Robinson-Earl, a five-star forward that is capable of playing all three positions in the frontcourt, is a homegrown talent whose father, Lester Earl, played for the Jayhawks. While he has yet to cut his list, many believe that his recruitment will boil down to North Carolina and Kansas. Roy Williams has his own connections with Robinson-Earl as he coached Robinson-Earl's father in Lawrence.

On the other end, Hurt is arguably the most prioritized prospect in recent years. Duke, North Carolina, Louisville, Kentucky and others are in the hunt. Duke and North Carolina will be tough to beat, but ultimately I think Hurt ends up at Kansas.

Trendon Watford
Trendon Watford (Nick Lucero/Rivals.com)

Alabama secured the commitment of reclassified top-20 guard Kira Lewis last week and the five-star prospect will be in Tuscaloosa this weekend. That's a great addition but does it mean much for the Crimson Tide's pursuit of Trendon Watford? No, but it sure does not hurt.

Lewis and Watford played the entire spring and summer months together on the travel circuit with the Georgia Stars and Hoop City Elite programs. There is chemistry and a bond between them, and before Lewis decided to reclassify, the two were among the top prospects in the 2019 class.

Watford is down to a final eight of Alabama, Memphis, Indiana, Kansas, Vanderbilt, LSU, TCU and Florida State. The leader right now? Memphis is in a great spot and should be seen as the program to beat. However, Florida State, LSU, Memphis and Alabama are heavily in the mix, too.

Look for Watford to have a handful of his official visits scheduled by next week, but don't expect commitment or signing to occur until the spring.