June 1, 2014

Pangos: Enoch creates buzz

THE RIVALS150: Class of 2014 | 2015 | 2016

LONG BEACH, Calif. -- The action picked up on the floor of Cabrillo High School during the second day of the 2014 Pangos All-American Camp. Several big name players had nice days while the much lesser-known Steve Enoch put a big buzz in the building.

Enoch arrives

Heading into Saturday's action at the Pangos All-American Camp, 6-foot-9 power forward Steve Enoch from Norwalk (Conn.) High was a pretty big mystery to most observers. Not because his talent is tough to figure out, but because the class of 2015 prospect hasn't yet gotten much exposure.

On Saturday, Enoch got plenty of exposure and he made the most of it.

Physically impressive, Enoch is a good athlete, has an ideal frame for a big man and he is extremely tough. Enoch can play rough-and-tumble basketball on the interior and he is an excellent rebounder. But, he's not without skill and his jump shot looks very fluid. Seeing him step out and knock down a three with confidence was impressive.

So far, Enoch's only high major offer is from Memphis but that will soon be changing. Others that have shown interest include Connecticut, Providence, Virginia, VCU, Kansas, Kansas State and Arizona State.

Enoch's summer coach George Mathews of High Rise Team Up has seen what the rising senior big man is capable of up close.

"We think that he's a high-major player," Mathews said. "He just hasn't been seen by a lot of schools yet."

Enoch looked the part of a high-major player this weekend and is likely earning himself a spot in the 2015 Rivals150 the next time it is updated.

Sampson a smooth operator

Unlike Enoch, Brandon Sampson is already a nationally ranked player. Like Enoch, Sampson hasn't yet gotten a lot of notoriety as a prospect. A 6-foot-5'ish shooting guard from Baton Rouge (La.) Madison Prep, Sampson is the No. 73 player in the class of 2015, but that will soon be changing.

Fact is, Sampson needs to be ranked a bit higher than that.

There are players who just make things look easy on the floor and Sampson is one of those players. A fluid athlete who can handle the ball, Sampson is the proud owner of one of the smoothest looking jump shots in the class of 2015. That jump shot is a real weapon and he has supreme confidence in it.

Because of Sampson's willingness to pull from 23 feet with accuracy, defenders are in trouble. If they crowd him, he can use his ball-handling ability and size to get by defenders and score in traffic. If anything, Sampson could stand to be a bit more aggressive off the dribble, but it is tough to complain too much about anything he does on the offensive end of the floor.

Sampson's recruitment figures to start picking up and LSU, St. John's, California, Mississippi State, Oklahoma State and Texas A&M are among a group of programs that have put in early work with him.

More Saturday notes

Top 50 shooting guard Admon Gilder was as efficient as they come during a 27-point outing. The rising senior from Dallas Madison made 12 of 15 shots from the field and never seemed to be rushing or forcing anything. He doesn't have the same explosive first step as Kansas State's Marcus Foster, but he is a little bigger and the two play a similar style.

Already committed to Baylor, class of 2016 wing Mark Vital is an explosive wing athlete with some strength. A four-star prospect, Vital hunts the rim in transition and tries to dunk everything that he can. Because of his physical ability, Vital has all the tools to develop into a high-level defender to go along with his open floor prowess.

Class of 2015 point guard Terrence Phillips has enjoyed a nice couple of days at Pangos. A three-star floor general from Mouth of Wilson (Va.) Oak Hill, Phillips is strong, compact and quick. He isn't he tallest point guard out there, but he is focused on pushing the tempo, getting his teammates involved and he appears to be a leader on the floor.

Tommy McCarthy and Sammy Barnes-Thompkins don't have big reputations, but they have both been pretty effective at camp. McCarthy is a tough point guard who can knock down a shot and doesn't make many mistakes. Barnes-Thompkins is an athletic 6-foot-2 shooting guard with good strength and a good looking jumper out to the three-point line.

Long Beach State looks to have gotten a really good one in power forward LaRond Williams. The 2015 power forward is a high-end athlete, does a good job on the boards and can run the floor at 6-foot-8.

We have to mention the play of Washington commit Marquese Chriss again. The class of 2015 four-star is on the rise and he was outstanding on Saturday. He's a thoroughbred athlete with quickness, explosive leaping ability and he was making 17-footers to go with dunking everything he could around the rim. Chriss is still a little raw but quite talented.

Class of 2015 Rivals150 point guard Kevin Dorsey is deserving of a bump up in the rankings. He is quick, he is tough and he is a leader on the floor. When he's making jumpers like he was during a Saturday afternoon game, Dorsey is pretty tough for opposing defenses to deal with.

Four-star wing Cameron Walker looked good. A 6-foot-6 scorer, Walker has a smooth looking jumper and doesn't force too much. As he learns to use his size to his advantage more by attacking off the dribble, he will round into a guy capable of being an effective scorer on the college level.

Eric Bossi is the national basketball recruiting analyst for Rivals.com. You can click here to follow him on Twitter.



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